Investors should work with farmers, not grab their land

Farmers protesting for land reform in Indonesia, 2004 (Photo: Jonathan McIntosh)

While not all large-scale land acquisitions can be defined as land grabbing, research by the Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) shows they carry risks for local communities and their environment, especially in countries where governance is weak and land rights unclear. Displacement of small farmers, loss of incomes and livelihoods for rural people and depletion of productive resources are all reported, with consequences including increased poverty and food insecurity, social fragmentation and conflicts.

Read more in The Guradian


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LifeMosaic is hiring

2nd Sep 2019
Do you want to join LifeMosaic's dedicated team? We are seeking a Programme Officer to support indigenous movements in Indonesia. Deadline for applications is 16th September 2019.


LifeMosaic Launches Indigenous Education Toolkit

29th Apr 2019
LifeMosaic and YP-MAN are launching Back to the Village: A Toolkit on Indigenous Education. This toolkit is for indigenous educators, indigenous school initiators, or for anyone that is interested in education that helps sustain diverse expressions of humanity.


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