Video / Audio - Mining and Oil

Karwara, people of the river - teaser

This is a teaser for a NEW documentary film about Kukama indigenous people from Peru’s Amazon who are using ancient myths and art to defend their sacred rivers from destruction. Legends about the Amazon’s rivers will be told through animations painted by Kukama children and adults, including the story of the Karwara spirits, or people of the river, who protect the waters and environment. Real-life footage will show how the Kukama live in harmony with their rivers, which they depend upon for survival. (Quisca Productions, 2015)


MELIKIN

MELIKIN

It was their native customary land until palm oil companies came and claimed it as their own. This is the story of Melikin. The story of many indigenous peoples in Sarawak, Malaysia. A short film from PANAP showing grassroots resistance by the indigenous peoples of a small community, who were joined by their neighbours, to protest against company control of their lands. (www.panap.net)


Keep the Oil in the Ground

Keep the Oil in the Ground

To national, local, and international leaders: The Amazon rainforest is critically important to the survival of our planet and the indigenous peoples that call it home. The International Energy Agency is unequivocal: two-thirds of fossil fuels need to be kept in the ground to avoid climate disaster. Given the science mandate to keep oil in the ground and the demands of our indigenous allies, the Amazon Basin is the perfect place to start. Leave the oil in the ground! (Amazon Watch, 2014)


Land Grabs: An Animated Guide

Land Grabs: An Animated Guide

In the past decade, more than 81 million acres of land - an area the size of Portugal - have been sold off to foreign investors without consenting farmers and local communities. These land grabs are tearing communities apart and leaving people hungry and homeless. (Oxfam America, 2014)


Heart of Iron

Heart of Iron

In the heart of the Congo Basin, global thirst for steel has driven miners to a vast, remote forest landscape called Tridom (Tri-national Dja-Odzala-Minkébé), which holds one of the largest untapped iron reserves on earth. Shot on location, Heart of Iron explores the complexity of mining in a region that is home to Baka and Bakola pygmy and Bantu tribes and a haven for gorillas, chimpanzees, and elephants. The iron mines promise jobs, infrastructure, and new revenues but can benefits be balanced with impacts? From ministers to miners, conservationists to community members, the film asks: How do we ensure that mining benefits the poor and conserves Tridom’s rich cultural and natural heritage? (WWF / EU / UNESCO / World Bank, 2013)


Share the benefits! Logging, mining and the Baka

Share the benefits! Logging, mining and the Baka

This song, produced by environmental artist Vicky Brown and artists from the village of Mintom in south-eastern Cameroon, calls for an equal distribution of timber and mining revenues being generated from the exploitation of their local forests and resources. (Living Earth UK, 2012)


The Sarayaku case

The Sarayaku case

Sarayaku is an indigenous community located in the province of Pastaza, in the Ecuadorian Amazon. Sarayaku ("River of Maize") is inhabited by 1,200 people from the Kichwa nationality. They operate a system of direct democracy. In 2002 the company CGC Argentina (Compañía General de Combustibles), accompanied by the Ecuadorian army illegally entered the territory of Sarayaku and buried 1500 Kg of pentolite, explosives used in seismic exploration for oil. The case was brought before the Inter-American Commission of Human Rights, creating a historical precedent in the defense of indigenous rights. The Constitution and the ILO Convention 169 determined to have prior, free and informed consent of indigenous peoples before starting exploitation. The people from Sarayaku won the case. But as this video will show, the threats to their community are far from over. (Arturo Hortas / Government of Aragon /EJOLT, 2012)


Our Forest, Our Lives: A Story from Muara Tae

Our Forest, Our Lives: A Story from Muara Tae

The Dayak Benuaq community of Muara Tae, in Indonesia’s East Kalimantan Province, are engaged in a fight against oil palm companies encroaching on their indigenous territory. (Gekko Studio, 2011)


African’s land rights vs. Sustainable development

African’s land rights vs. Sustainable development

In the new scramble for Africa, big business is looking for huge swathes of land for agriculture and biofuels. Governments are only too happy to sell it to them, but at what costs to the local people? This 25 minute debate with experts from African civil society groups explores the issue of land grabbing in Africa. The international NGO Rights and Resources Initiative (RRI) has released two reports, examining land transactions in West and Central Africa, which have implications for what is happening across the continent. They say governments are often dangerously split, with one ministry moving to protect rural land rights, while another is busy selling it off to agribusiness and mining. But large-scale developments are already planned for nearly three quarters of the country, meaning these rights may not be worth the paper they are written on. Other examples are present in Ghana, where a project converting forest and crop land into jatropha (a plant used to make biodiesel) plantations resulted in harsh migrant-native farmer conflicts over lost jobs and income, along with the clearing of 780 hectares. (PressTVGlobalNews 2013)


Screams of the Amazon

Screams of the Amazon

Oil Round in southeastern Ecuador offers national and transnational companies about 3 million tropical forest home seven indigenous nacionalides. The signing of contracts with oil companies is privista for October this year. (Pacha Producciones, 2013)


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