Video / Audio - Plantations

La Isla - A Cycle of Death

La Isla - A Cycle of Death

'La Isla - A Cycle of Death' focuses on the community of La Isla de Viudas (The Isle of Widows) outside of Chichigalpa, Nicaragua, but it is a powerful introduction to a much larger global issue. Sadly, the stories shared are in no way isolated or limited to this area. Throughout the sugarcane industry in Central America child labor is rampant, widows from this disease far too common and young workers will likely not escape their fate, many will perish as their fathers have. (Tierra Unida Films, 2011)


What Rainforest?

When bulldozers mowed over the ancestral farmlands of Kampung Lebor, Segan Anak Degon stood his ground and defended his land. Now, he is the only person out of 101 families whose land is left intact and unaffected by the oil palm plantation. However, Segan is the rare few who managed to halt the feverish onslaught of oil palm advancement that threatens to devastate the embattled Sarawak forested landscape. Wake up and smell the palm oil! (Ketapang Pictures, 2008)


Progress or Problem? – part 1

Progress or Problem? – part 1

Indonesia is the biggest producer of palm oil in the world. This film is based on the voices of indigenous peoples in Indonesia who have directly experienced the impacts of oil palm plantations on the land that they have lived and worked on for generations. The film is one-hour educational film made with 20 indigenous communities in Indonesia. It aims to help community members in oil palm plantations or plantation expansion areas to make informed decisions on the future uses of their ancestral lands. Part 1 focuses on the impacts of oil palm and contains an introduction, and chapters on local economics, farming systems, water, culture, land and conflict. (LifeMosaic, 2007)


Progress or Problem? – part 2

Progress or Problem? – part 2

Indonesia is the biggest producer of palm oil in the world. This film is based on the voices of indigenous peoples in Indonesia who have directly experienced the impacts of oil palm plantations on the land that they have lived and worked on for generations. The film is one-hour educational film made with 20 indigenous communities in Indonesia. It aims to help community members in oil palm plantations or plantation expansion areas to make informed decisions on the future uses of their ancestral lands. Part 2 contains chapters on Community-Led Alternatives and Community Tactics for accepting or refusing oil palm. (LifeMosaic, 2007)


Palmed Off

Palmed Off

Palmed Off is based on testimonies from indigenous peoples affected by oil palm plantations in Indonesia and explores the impacts of oil palm plantations on their local economies, on the local environment, on their culture and on the prospects for the future generations. (LifeMosaic, 2007)


Eyes on the Kampar Peninsula

Eyes on the Kampar Peninsula

The Kampar Peninsula is 700,000 hectares of peatland up to 15 metres deep, on the island of Sumatra, Indonesia. The peat contains more than 2 billion tonnes of carbon. 400,000 hectares of forest remain standing, 300,000 hectares have been converted to oil palm and pulp and paper plantations. All eyes are on the Kampar: loggers, carbon traders, and plantation companies including the giant RAPP pulpwood planter. But where does this leave the Akit and Melayu indigenous peoples who inhabit the peninsula? This film tells the human story behind one of the biggest carbon stores in the world. (LifeMosaic, 2009)


Indigenous Peoples: The Guardian of Indonesian Forest

Indigenous Peoples: The Guardian of Indonesian Forest

From Papua to Sumatra, representatives of indigenous peoples agree on the importance of forests. They have proven themselves to be the faithful guardians of Indonesian forests. From Papua to Sumatra, communities are facing similar troubles in the destruction of their forests: large-scale oil palm, plantation forest, and mining concessions. Can Indonesia’s indigenous communities protect more than 15 million hectares of currently pristine customary forests? To save lives, biodiversity, and global climate. This film urges everyone to think clearly, especially to the Indonesian government to place their complete trust in these communities to sustainably manage forests. (Telapak / Gekko Studio, 2011)


Sinar Mas Myths and Realities

Sinar Mas Myths and Realities

Sinar Mas, Indonesia's largest palm oil and paper company with arms including APP and Golden Agri Resources, spins a tale about how it protects rainforests and peatlands. But in reality, Sinar Mas continues hell-bent on destruction as this recent evidence from Greenpeace shows... For the real story, go to http://www.greenpeace.org/sinar-mas


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