Video / Audio - Mining and Oil

African’s land rights vs. Sustainable development

African’s land rights vs. Sustainable development

In the new scramble for Africa, big business is looking for huge swathes of land for agriculture and biofuels. Governments are only too happy to sell it to them, but at what costs to the local people? This 25 minute debate with experts from African civil society groups explores the issue of land grabbing in Africa. The international NGO Rights and Resources Initiative (RRI) has released two reports, examining land transactions in West and Central Africa, which have implications for what is happening across the continent. They say governments are often dangerously split, with one ministry moving to protect rural land rights, while another is busy selling it off to agribusiness and mining. But large-scale developments are already planned for nearly three quarters of the country, meaning these rights may not be worth the paper they are written on. Other examples are present in Ghana, where a project converting forest and crop land into jatropha (a plant used to make biodiesel) plantations resulted in harsh migrant-native farmer conflicts over lost jobs and income, along with the clearing of 780 hectares. (PressTVGlobalNews 2013)


Screams of the Amazon

Screams of the Amazon

Oil Round in southeastern Ecuador offers national and transnational companies about 3 million tropical forest home seven indigenous nacionalides. The signing of contracts with oil companies is privista for October this year. (Pacha Producciones, 2013)


The survival of the Wayúu people

The survival of the Wayúu people

Through traditional dance, indigenous Wayúu women and girls give expression to how their life has been before and after. The pink colour symbolizes the flower of the cactus that blooms in abundance in this semi-arid region. The black represents coal. For the last three decades, this community has neighboured the Cerrejon mine which produces some 89,000 tons of coal daily. (PBI Colombia, 2012)


A singer from Cacarica talks about his beloved homeland

A singer from Cacarica talks about his beloved homeland

15 years ago more than 4,000 people were displaced in Bajo Atrato, Chocó. Amin from the group Renaciente was one of them. Here he talks about his homeland, forced displacement and resistance: "It means a lot to us because it is the love that we feel for this land where we were born, where our ancestors, our elders, our grandparents have struggled, have worked, and we have been raised on this land and it is this land that we take care of that gives us sustenance, our life project you may say." (PBI Colombia, 2012)


Uwa indigenous people opt for a future without oil

Uwa indigenous people opt for a future without oil

Defending their land is the priority of the Uwa people. Their ancestral territory covers approximately 14.000 square kilometers - an area half the size of Belgium. Today however, they possess only 14% of these lands. Currently there are two projects under development in the region that would affect the indigenous reserve. One of these is the Niscota Block, an oil extraction project extending more than 600 square kilometers. Plans are also underway to construct a pipeline. For the Uwa people, the fact that their territory contains rich oil deposits has been harmful and detrimental. (Colombia PBI, 2011)


We are MANILAKBAYAN

We are MANILAKBAYAN

MANILAKBAYAN is a Mindanao People's Mobilization for Land, the Environment, and Human Rights that brings voices of concern on mining affected communities and the attacks on environment defenders. Against these threats to land and life, Mindanao peoples -- Lumads, Moro and settlers -- continue the valiant commitment to defend the environment and national patrimony, resisting Goliaths of plunder and terror driven by corporate mining. (JL Burgos / Red Ants Productions, 2012)


Indigenous Peoples: The Guardian of Indonesian Forest

Indigenous Peoples: The Guardian of Indonesian Forest

From Papua to Sumatra, representatives of indigenous peoples agree on the importance of forests. They have proven themselves to be the faithful guardians of Indonesian forests. From Papua to Sumatra, communities are facing similar troubles in the destruction of their forests: large-scale oil palm, plantation forest, and mining concessions. Can Indonesia’s indigenous communities protect more than 15 million hectares of currently pristine customary forests? To save lives, biodiversity, and global climate. This film urges everyone to think clearly, especially to the Indonesian government to place their complete trust in these communities to sustainably manage forests. (Telapak / Gekko Studio, 2011)


Native Ecuadorans protest mining projects

Native Ecuadorans protest mining projects

Thousands of Ecuadoreans have taken to the streets of the capital Quito in protests over large-scale mining projects. Indigenous people on Thursday expressed anger over the government's decision to allow mining on their ancestral lands. (Al Jazeera's-Mariana Sanchez-Quito, 2012)


LifeMosaic is a Not for Profit Company Limited by Guarantee (Registered company number: SC300597) and a Charity Registered in Scotland (Scottish Charity number: SC040573)